Posted By Jes S. Posted On

Mystery Of Winged Tiny ‘Human Skeletοns’ Uncοvered In ‘Ancient Lοndοn Hοuse Basement’

In the cellar of an ancient home in London, the skeletal remains of winged fairies, werewolves, and aliens were allegedly discovered.

The macabre collection appears to feature a variety of mythical creatures in jars and containers depicted in grisly poses.

Fairies whose flesh has rotted away and whose wings have been affixed to display boards are displayed alongside sinister-looking extraterrestrial bodies and hairy humanoid remains.

In addition to drawings of Jack the Ripper victims Catherine Eddowes and Elizabeth Stride, the hoard contained jars containing purported human hearts and other organs.

The macabre exhibits were said to have belonged to Thomas Theodore Merrylin, who was described as “a wealthy aristocrat and biologist in the nineteenth century.”

A blog post about the alleged discoveries stated: “In 1960, when Thomas Theodore Merrylin’s long-abandoned London mansion was to be demolished to make way for a new residential neighborhood, the site was being cleared in London for the construction of a new residential neighborhood.

“Builders have discovered several thousand tightly sealed wooden crates in the home’s cellar.”

“Imagine their astonishment when they discovered inside the corpses of odd mythical creatures that appeared to have existed only in legends.”

The startling artifacts were disclosed by the artist Alex CF, who claimed Merrylin’s diaries contain references to “a variety of advanced concepts that did not exist at the time, including quantum physics and the multiverse theory.”

His diaries allegedly contain scientific explanations for many of the specimens in his collection that appear to be mythical.

Alex CF claims to be the curator of the online-accessible collection.

However, the plot is a well-crafted narrative constructed by the artist.

One online commenter, James Campbell, commented on the pieces: “Did this man plunder the props department of Hammer films? I mean, come on, people.

If such specimens had been discovered, the British Museum would have devoted an entire wing to them.

Trey Wait, a second participant, added: “Clearly a hoax, but still incredibly amazing! I would adore to have this.”